Rug Tips & Tricks

RUG PADS

The right type of pad underneath your rug provides many benefits, from keeping the rug from slipping on the floor or from buckling, to acting as a “shock absorber” for foot traffic, to lessening the wear on the rug’s fibers.

These are the best pads for your rugs (and for your floors too).

PAD RECOMMENDATIONS

  • For use on smooth, hard flooring, such as Linoleum, tile, Pergo and some hardwoods. Pad thickness is 3/32 inch.

  • For use on uneven flooring, and some smooth, hard floors, such as Mexican and ceramic tiles, concrete, brick, marble and all hardwood. This also works rather well over installed sisal and seagrass flooring. Has a 10-year performance warranty by the manufacturer (NoMuv). Pad thickness is 1/4 inch.

    The National Hardwood Association recommends Durahold Pad as the best pad to allow wood floors to “breathe” properly and to keep a more consistent color tone in all areas.

  • For use with small rugs on carpeting only (with NO furniture). These pads are sold in most home improvement stores. It is a white fabric, with a light adhesive on both sides, which can “hold” a small rug in place on most types of wall-to-wall carpeting.

    It does not protect from wear, nor does it serve as an adequate source of support, but it will help greatly in preventing tripping. It also serves to provide a barrier in case you worry that your rug might discolor the carpeting beneath it.

    This pad is inexpensive, and has a very limited lifespan, so they need to be replaced frequently.

ORIENTAL RUGS ON TOP OF WALL-TO-WALL CARPETING

This is a tough topic because rugs, to begin with, are meant to be used on hard flooring, not soft. Having rugs on top of carpeting, and putting heavy furniture on top of them, can lead to safety issues (from buckling) as well as to structural damage to the rug’s foundation fibers.
We have not found an ideal choice of padding for use on wall-to-wall carpeting. NoMuv used to have an acceptible pad variation for this purpose, but after redeveloping the product a few years back, we saw the efficacy drop dramatically, and a large increase in returns, due to dissatisfaction. So we stopped selling that particular product, leaving a void in our recommendations, in this realm.

RUG STORAGE

The biggest dangers for rugs placed into long-term storage are BUGS, FLOODS and THUGS.

Insect damage, flood or mildew damage, and theft are the most common problems we hear from clients who have placed rugs in a local storage unit or placed in a far corner of a closet or garage. Many times, rugs with high appraised or sentimental value are placed in storage to save them for family members, or to save them from a remodel mess, or to protect them from the summer sunlight. You want to make sure you are not actually causing damage by incorporating the wrong storage procedures.

SAFE STORAGE TIPS

  • DO clean and moth-repel rugs before wrapping

    DO clean and moth-repel rugs before wrapping them for storage. You must clean your rugs of flood and liquid material before storage. Although moths are normally the storage “bad guys,” any insect will eat sugars and other food spills, and they will eat the wool fibers that are holding this meal for them too. An insect repellant will make your rug unappetizing to moths, but you must wash the rug thoroughly first to ensure it is fully protected.

  • DO roll your rugs starting at the bottom end to the top end, fuzzy side inside

    DO roll your rugs starting at the bottom end to the top end, fuzzy side inside. To find the bottom end of your rug, you want to “pet” your rug to determine pile direction. Like an animal’s fur, the surface will feel smooth going WITH the nap and rough going AGAINST the nap. When you run your hand WITH the nap, the pile will “point” toward the bottom end of the rug. Roll the rug from this end – this will ensure the rug will hold a nice, tight roll. Folding rugs causes creasing and cracking over time, so do NOT fold rugs being put into long-term storage.

  • DO roll your silk rugs with the fuzzy side

    DO roll your silk rugs with the fuzzy side (the pile side) outside. Wool and cotton rugs have more “give” to them than silk rugs do, so when placing silk rugs into storage, roll them with their fuzzy silk side outside. This creates less strain on the foundation fibers over time.

  • DO wrap your rugs in TYVEK or brown acid-free PAPER

    DO wrap your rugs in TYVEK or brown acid-free PAPER. Wool has a moisture content even when it is dry, so changes in heat can cause it to “sweat.” because of this you should NEVER wrap wool rugs in plastic or you will create a potential mildew problem. Tyvek paper is best (tear- and water-resistant).

  • DO elevate your rug packages off the ground

    DO elevate your rug packages off the ground. Many storage facilities are built in lowlands that may have a tendency to flood during bad weather, so whether in your home or in an off-site location you always want to keep rugs at least six inches off the ground, in case flooding occurs.

  • DO make certain nothing heavy is stacked on top of your rugs

    DO make certain nothing heavy is stacked on top of your rugs. Heavy items can cause damage to the rug’s foundation.

  • DO acquire insurance to protect your rugs when placed in a storage facility

    DO acquire insurance to protect your rugs when placed in a storage facility. You also want a photograph and appraisal on file in case you need them.

If you are in the San Diego area and want to place rugs in storage, we offer cleaning and wrapping services, as well as storage space in our own climate-controlled facility. Just give us a call at 858-566-3833

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